THEME BY SARAHCATHS+
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It’s an incredibly well-written script, and an incredibly well-written character that’s very complex. The script felt so natural I felt like I was reading a transcript of people talking, not like it was written dialogue. I loved everything about it. I loved that it was a movie about people finding family and learning to love themselves. I loved that it was subtly complex with this whole other internal world that was inside of Grace that I was able to create on my own. 

posted 1 day ago with 2,208 notes
cinephiliabeyond:

The Daily Beast’s Marlow Stern had the pleasure of speaking with David Lynch about everything from his influential foundation, to when we can expect to see his next film, to disappointing Kanye West.

It’s a strange time. There’s not a whole lot that any of us can do about it. You’ve seen waves of things go up and down, but maybe the arthouse will be back in vogue, and they’ll reappear all over the place again. I don’t know. It would be beautiful. Cable television is the new arthouse, so it’s there, but it’s not the big screen. If people have a big screen at home, great sound, and they turn the lights down and turn their phones off, they can get into the world and have an experience. But most people don’t watch films that way anymore. —David Lynch on Transcendental Meditation, ‘True Detective,’ and Collaborating With Kanye West 



If you are a fan of David Lynch, Pretty as a Picture: The Art of David Lynch (1997) is essential viewing. It was mainly filmed during the making of Lost Highway and most of the features are set around that film, but there is also some other scenes like the reunion of Eraserhead, where Lynch along with some of the cast and crew return to the Stables location where it was filmed and reminisce over the trials of the making of the film. Also featured is Lynch’s trip to Prague along with the composer on most of his films, Angelo Badalamenti, and his love of the sound and music which is so important in his films. His paintings and photography are shown, too, and his fascination with ants and animals in his art. There is a rare look at his early short films, Six Men Getting Sick, The Alphabet and The Grandmother, and his former wife Peggy’s views on them. This is a fascinating and interesting behind the scenes look at this distinctive filmmaker, artist and photographer’s work.
Toby Keeler, with his unlimited access to David Lynch — behind the scenes during his films, with friends and family and collaborators, and in his painting process — has a documentary that’s essential to get at least a glimpse into a man and his work like this. Lynch’s films are abstractions, nightmarish landscapes and what is just around the corner in the seemingly brightest sides of small-town American life, and his art is a reflection not just of his own interpretations of people and places that are usually conventional, but that this interpretation springs out so many ideas that would not be there otherwise without the specific framework he’s chosen. One of the most fascinating examples of this method of Lynch’s in being a true master of mood is with Eraserhead; he worked five years on the film, and Keeler shows us Lynch and old friends walking around where the original sets were, and with this revealing how after two years of painstakingly filming a movie (a shot a night, nevermind a scene, depending on the lighting), a rhythm developed that was unmistakable. If one of the primary goals of an artist is to transport people to another place that is unconventional, but still grounded in recognizable emotional connections, Lynch is such an artist, as revealed here fully.


For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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cinephiliabeyond:

The Daily Beast’s Marlow Stern had the pleasure of speaking with David Lynch about everything from his influential foundation, to when we can expect to see his next film, to disappointing Kanye West.

It’s a strange time. There’s not a whole lot that any of us can do about it. You’ve seen waves of things go up and down, but maybe the arthouse will be back in vogue, and they’ll reappear all over the place again. I don’t know. It would be beautiful. Cable television is the new arthouse, so it’s there, but it’s not the big screen. If people have a big screen at home, great sound, and they turn the lights down and turn their phones off, they can get into the world and have an experience. But most people don’t watch films that way anymore. —David Lynch on Transcendental Meditation, ‘True Detective,’ and Collaborating With Kanye West

If you are a fan of David Lynch, Pretty as a Picture: The Art of David Lynch (1997) is essential viewing. It was mainly filmed during the making of Lost Highway and most of the features are set around that film, but there is also some other scenes like the reunion of Eraserhead, where Lynch along with some of the cast and crew return to the Stables location where it was filmed and reminisce over the trials of the making of the film. Also featured is Lynch’s trip to Prague along with the composer on most of his films, Angelo Badalamenti, and his love of the sound and music which is so important in his films. His paintings and photography are shown, too, and his fascination with ants and animals in his art. There is a rare look at his early short films, Six Men Getting Sick, The Alphabet and The Grandmother, and his former wife Peggy’s views on them. This is a fascinating and interesting behind the scenes look at this distinctive filmmaker, artist and photographer’s work.

Toby Keeler, with his unlimited access to David Lynch — behind the scenes during his films, with friends and family and collaborators, and in his painting process — has a documentary that’s essential to get at least a glimpse into a man and his work like this. Lynch’s films are abstractions, nightmarish landscapes and what is just around the corner in the seemingly brightest sides of small-town American life, and his art is a reflection not just of his own interpretations of people and places that are usually conventional, but that this interpretation springs out so many ideas that would not be there otherwise without the specific framework he’s chosen. One of the most fascinating examples of this method of Lynch’s in being a true master of mood is with Eraserhead; he worked five years on the film, and Keeler shows us Lynch and old friends walking around where the original sets were, and with this revealing how after two years of painstakingly filming a movie (a shot a night, nevermind a scene, depending on the lighting), a rhythm developed that was unmistakable. If one of the primary goals of an artist is to transport people to another place that is unconventional, but still grounded in recognizable emotional connections, Lynch is such an artist, as revealed here fully.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

posted 1 day ago with 139 notes

Tracce Naturali, photographed by Arnaud Pyvka for Marie Claire Italia, April 2009. 

Tracce Naturali, photographed by Arnaud Pyvka for Marie Claire Italia, April 2009. 

posted 1 day ago with 37 notes

stevemccurrystudios:

Body language is a very powerful tool. We had body language before we had speech, and apparently, 80% of what you understand in a conversation is read through the body, not the words.
- Deborah Bull

Grade was in all her steps, heaven in her eye, in every gesture dignity and love.
-John Milton, Paradise Lost

Please follow us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/stevemccurryofficial

posted 1 day ago with 725 notes
I would rather die of passion than of boredom.

-  Vincent Van Gogh  (via goddessmorrigan)
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criterioncast:


Cecil B. deMille writes to Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger, after watching Tales Of Hoffman

Recently I had the belated pleasure of seeing your picture “Tales of Hoffman”. Perhaps you will not mind my writing you a fan letter about it.
From my earliest theatre going days I have been a lover of Grand Opera. The physical drawbacks of the average operatic presentation have often bothered me - in fact it is hard for me to remember a production which did not make heavy demands on the imagination. The only satisfactory frame of mind to bring to the theatre was to say to oneself, “Well - you can’t have everything.”
Your production of “Tales of Hoffman” has proven that you can have everything. For the first time in my life I was treated to Grand Opera where the beauty, power and scope of the music was equally matched by the visual presentation.
I thank you for outstanding courage and artistry in bringing to us Grand Opera as it existed until now, only in the minds of those who created it.
Sincerely,
Cecil B. deMille

The restored Tales Of Hoffman will be screening at the Venice Film Festival on August 31st.

criterioncast:

Cecil B. deMille writes to Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger, after watching Tales Of Hoffman

Recently I had the belated pleasure of seeing your picture “Tales of Hoffman”. Perhaps you will not mind my writing you a fan letter about it.

From my earliest theatre going days I have been a lover of Grand Opera. The physical drawbacks of the average operatic presentation have often bothered me - in fact it is hard for me to remember a production which did not make heavy demands on the imagination. The only satisfactory frame of mind to bring to the theatre was to say to oneself, “Well - you can’t have everything.”

Your production of “Tales of Hoffman” has proven that you can have everything. For the first time in my life I was treated to Grand Opera where the beauty, power and scope of the music was equally matched by the visual presentation.

I thank you for outstanding courage and artistry in bringing to us Grand Opera as it existed until now, only in the minds of those who created it.

Sincerely,

Cecil B. deMille

The restored Tales Of Hoffman will be screening at the Venice Film Festival on August 31st.

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artnerdnewyork:

VIDEO: Live Painting with Picasso on Art Nerd New York http://art-nerd.com/newyork/video-live-painting-with-picasso/

artnerdnewyork:

VIDEO: Live Painting with Picasso on Art Nerd New York http://art-nerd.com/newyork/video-live-painting-with-picasso/

posted 2 days ago with 18 notes
bats-n-cats:

☆。*☽Halloween Haven☾*。☆

bats-n-cats:

☆。*☽Halloween Haven☾*。☆

posted 2 days ago with 6,803 notes